Planck's Map of Matter in the Universe

Planck_planck13-002c_1024

planck_planck13-002c April 16th, 2013

Credit: ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech

This full-sky map from the Planck mission shows matter between Earth and the edge of the observable universe. Regions with less mass show up as lighter areas while regions with more mass are darker. The grayed-out areas are where light from our own galaxy was too bright, blocking Planck's ability to map the more distant matter.

Normal matter, which is made up of atoms, is only a small percent of the total mass in our universe. Most of the matter in the universe is dark -- that is, it does not emit or absorb any light -- so creating a map of its distribution is challenging. To make the full-sky map, the Planck team took advantage of the fact that all matter, even dark matter, has gravity that will affect light traveling to us from near the very edge of the observable universe. Planck mapped this light, called the cosmic microwave background, with exquisite precision over the whole sky, enabling scientists to create this matter map.

This view of the data is in an equirectangular projection suitable for projection onto a sphere, and is useful for full-dome presentations. The projection is in galactic coordinates with the galactic plane running horizontally along the midpoint of the image. Note that most graphics software will map images to the outside of a sphere; since this is the inside projection looking outwards the image should be flipped horizontally when used with such software.

Planck is a European Space Agency mission, with significant participation from NASA. NASA's Planck Project Office is based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. JPL contributed mission-enabling technology for both of Planck's science instruments. European, Canadian and U.S. Planck scientists work together to analyze the Planck data.

<a href="http://planck.ipac.caltech.edu/system/media_files/binaries/9/original/Planck-MassMap.tif?1366073492"><strong>Download layered Mass Map</strong></a>

Image Source: http://planck.ipac.caltech.edu/image/planck13-001c

Curator: NASA Planck Science Center, Pasadena, CA, USA

Image Use Policy: Public Domain

Image Details

Image Type
Observation
Object Name
Subject - Distant Universe
Cosmology > Phenomenon > Dark Matter

Distance

Planck_planck13-002c_128
 

Position Details

Position (GAL)
RA = 0h 0m 0.0s
DEC = 0° 0’ 0.0”
Orientation
North is up
Field of View
360.0 x 180.0 degrees
Constellation
Pisces

Color Mapping

  Telescope Spectral Band Wavelength
Arrow_left_ - -
Spectrum_xray1w
Planck_planck13-002c_1280
×
ID
planck13-002c
Subject Category
D.6.2.3  
Subject Name
Credits
ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech
Release Date
2013-04-16
Lightyears
Redshift
Reference Url
http://planck.ipac.caltech.edu/image/planck13-001c
Type
Observation
Image Quality
Good
Distance Notes
Facility
-
Instrument
-
Color Assignment
Band
Bandpass
-
Central Wavelength
-
Start Time
-
Integration Time
-
Dataset ID
-
Notes
Coordinate Frame
GAL
Equinox
Reference Value
0.00000000000, 0.00000000000
Reference Dimension
6400, 3200
Reference Pixel
3600.5, 1800.5
Scale
-0.05625, 0.05625
Rotation
0
Coordinate System Projection:
CAR
Quality
Full
FITS Header
Notes
Equirectangular projection suited for mapping onto a sphere. Note that if wrapped to the outside of a sphere, the image should be flipped horizontally to compensate for the outward-looking sky perspective of the map.
Creator (Curator)
NASA Planck Science Center
URL
http://planck.ipac.caltech.edu
Name
-
Email
Telephone
Address
1200 E. California Blvd.
City
Pasadena
State/Province
CA
Postal Code
91125
Country
USA
Rights
Public Domain
Publisher
Publisher ID
planck
Resource ID
Resource URL
Related Resources
Metadata Date
2018-01-19T01:59:01Z
Metadata Version
1.2
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Detailed color mapping information coming soon...

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There is no distance meta data in this image.